Monday, 12th February, 1866

I am sitting up writing in my journal an hour or two today, and the rain is coming down in torrents. Has rained all night I believe. Day very changeable and warm. Bill is having corn shucked and straw hauled in the lot. – – Another ewe disowns one of her lambs, something very remarkable. Second instance of this kind this spring. She has two beautiful healthy strong lambs and refuses to nurse one of them. Bill brought it in and I fixed some milk for it. I am afraid I shall have to make a pit pet lamb of it, and they are so troublesome. One gave me so much trouble last spring. – – I have been repairing some pants and a roundabout for the boys today. Gave John another pair of pants today. – – It is so very wet. Zac had to ride to school today. – – Had Hardie’s wild turkey for dinner. They all enjoyed it very much. – – Mr. Norment and Jack Cooke spent the afternoon.1 They wish the privilege of loading wood at our landing. Bill granted it. – – Nannie commenced French under Hardie today. Hope she will make good progress while he remains at home. He has such a perfect knowledge of the French language. – – Had the parsnips and carrots taken up by Martha, and the old peasticks removed in order to commence gardening when the weather is fit.

  1. Jack is surely John McPherson Cooke, son of the late Reverend John Cooke of Hanover who we met in a footnote on 20 September, 1864. Jack seems to have recently moved to Enfield. He is with his neighbor Sam Norment of White Bank.  (back)