Sunday, 18th February, 1866

A cloudy, rainy, dismal looking day. Set in to rain the evening and rained all night. Nan is quite indisposed and remained at home and Bill with her. Hill wished to know if Bill sent him a message. He is very uneasy respecting the administration of Col. Hill in Jno. Deffarge’s estate, as he is one of the securities among many others.1 – – We called by Ju’s a few minutes and home to dinner. Hardie rode Fannie. Zac went in the carriage with me, Randall drove. Some dissatisfaction is produced with Corbin on account of higher wages being offered by his former mistress, though our bargain was set for a stipulated price for this year. He has forfeited the contract and we have to increase his wages in order to get him to remain. – – Commenced weighing meat to the men this morning. Tom has been sick several days.

  1. Col. William Claiborne Hill and John S. DeFarges were in-laws. The Colonel’s son Claiborne Johnson Hill, often referred to as Major Claiborne Hill, married DeFarges’ daughter Susan Ann (Puss). We met this couple back on 6 July, 1864. John S. and his wife Adaline [Neale] Defarges had two other children: Alice N., who died of “intermittent fever” in March 1864 at the age of 16 while at Albemarle Female Institute, and John S. Defarges, Jr. who would now be about 16. John Sr. died in 1856, a full decade before Caroline’s journal entry. From her entry we learn that Col. Hill administered John Senior’s estate and her brother-in-law James Hill King had posted a bond on behalf of Col. Hill as administrator. We also are reminded of how long the settlement of estates can be. Unfortunately I have yet to find any information about the estate, or the source of Caroline’s concern. It also may be appropriate to note here that the family name, of obvious French heritage, is found spelled in multiple ways. Sometimes there is a space following the De, other times not. If there is a space the first letter is sometimes not capitalized, as in “de Farges.” The f is usually capitalized, but not always. In some older renderings there are two ffs. Caroline uses Deffarges. And then there is the matter of pronunciation; is the s pronounced or not? That may account for some written renderings that drop the s. Researchers using computer text searches must be careful to use all possibilities. And if any of our readers can provide pronunciation help, please do. I chose to default to DeFarges in this footnote. But I can be talked out of it.  (back)