Monday, 9th April, 1866

A cold, disagreeable day. Had the potato plants covered last night. Prepared another bed, fearing the cold weather might injure those already out, as so many persons had lost theirs. Picked out the few remaining seed, about 3 pecks. – – Nan’s up today, but very feeble and looks very badly. – – Bill dug the bed out and Jim hauled the manure. Addison put in the wheat chaff instead of corn stalks like the other and when Zac returned from school, he and I put in the potatoes. Hardie came about that time. Had been to accompany Miss Lockhart on horseback to Liberty Hall. Had a nice time at Mrs. Hill’s he said, and was very much pleased with Miss Lockhart.1 He and Zac went out floating after he changed his clothes. – – Bill rode to the W. O. this evening to see the fishermen about trespassing on our property, burning rails, wood, &c. – – Planted cucumbers today. Patsy washed today. I think she is very anxious that I should agree for Martha to come back, but I prefer that she should take her pleasure and enjoy herself elsewhere at present. They are performing rather too much for my way.

  1. Liberty Hall, located on the Pamunkey upriver from Elsing Green across Jack’s Creek, originally belonged to the Claiborne family. It was the home of Mrs. Anne [Lewis] Munday until her death, mentioned by Caroline on 9 October, 1864. Lockhard was not a surname associated with King William County in those days, but Lukhard certainly was. However the 1860 and 1870 US censuses yield no appropriately aged Miss Lockhart/Lukhard. The pen and ink drawing of Liberty Hall was created by Rex Merrill Allyn as part of the WPA Federal Art Project in Virginia. The image is available online courtesy of the Library of Virginia at https://lva.omeka.net/items/show/222.  (back)