Friday, 7th September, 1866

Showery all day. – – Patsy washed. – – Liv rode George to the C. H. and returned to breakfast after we had finished. Got ammunition for shooting sora. Bill and Zac went in the marsh and killed a doz. or so. They were caught in a hard shower of rain and came in as wet as drowned rats. Had a sora pie for dinner. Martha cooked. – – Addison’s getting about a little, doing some housework today. – – Jim came out this morning and brought a load of wood. The quinine had a good effect last night, about 25 gn. Bill carried him at bedtime. Had a chill about midnight last night. Settled with Theresa Harris for Tom and Tyler machining wheat here, 8 lbs. bacon @ 25, making $2.1 – – Liv’s packing up and getting ready to leave for Richmond this evening. Started about 5 o’clk. on George to go as far as Ju’s tonight. Washington went to bring the horse back. He doesn’t know exactly how he will go over. Poor child! I felt very sad at parting with him and Zac is going tomorrow. Gave Pigeo _?_ $2.75 cts. to return and ten cts. for Nan. – – They made and baked some ginger cakes this evening for the boys, but Liv started before they were done. The shoemaker came this evening. Gave Zac $1.75 cts. for him, which he owed him for mending shoes. – – We sat up quite late. Fixed up his money for Lexington ($250) two hundred and fifty dollars. – – Gave him some little things this evening, such as pens, paper, soap for shaving and washing, pen holder, &c. Packed his trunk late this evening. I wanted to have packed it for him, but he so much occupies my every moment in one way or other that I can appoint no specified time for any one thing. – – How much I shall grieve to part with my dear child tomorrow. We shall all miss him so much, though he is thoughtless and sometimes careless and indifferent about some things. – – I shall miss him most on Sundays at Zion, where he scarcely ever failed to be on that day.

  1. Caroline seems to be settling up with a mother for the work done by two sons. But the identity of Theresa remains a mystery. The Eliza Harris household from the 1860 census contains a Thomas who would be about the right age. But that family does not have a Tyler, nor a Theresa. Or could Theresa be Thyrsa Harris, now about 26, who is listed in the 1850 census as probably a daughter of the late Sterling Harris and wife Ann?  (back)