Friday, 12th October, 1866

The day is rather better. Cleared up after the morning, but a very great quantity of water has fallen during the last few days. I don’t know when we shall be able to go about the wheat again. Bill rode to the C. H., took breakfast with Ju. Gave him $5 to purchase a pair of shoes of Maj. Butts.1  – – Bake finished hemming the day towel she commenced last night. Pigeo and Nan rode to Mrs. Hill’s after dinner, the former on George and Nannie on Fannie. Changed saddles with Mrs. Larkin Garrett as they passed. I am a little indisposed this evening, and I think Bake is a little also. She bears the separation from George much better than I expected. Has written to him and sent a letter from Mr. Shafter to him, one of some importance, and rather a presumptuous one, one that has given her some uneasiness. We went round, she and I, to collect and select some articles of housekeeping. I will enumerate them. One feather bed and 2 pillows and a bolster, a pair of sheets, a comfort and white counterpane to be put up in a coarse sheet. Also a muslin quilt. Those things in addition to a yarn counterpane, calico quilt and pair of pillow cases already given. – – Gave her some little things for the table and a table cloth, ½ doz. breakfast plates and a butter dish (China), ½ doz. cup plates, ½ doz. gilt cups and saucers, ½ doz. little goblets, and 2 water glasses. Two glass preserve saucers and a molasses stand, 2 salt spoons and a little knife and fork for pickles, a China teapot and white and gilt waiter, 2 little bake pans and ½ doz. muffin molds, 2 little white dishes, one rug and a little yarn counterpane for a cradle, ½ gallon peach pickle.

  1. Perhaps the purchase by Bill of shoes from Maj. Butts is an indicator of the close relations he established with the white community in King William, to the eventual displeasure of the county’s newly freedmen suggested in the 14 August footnote.  (back)