Saturday, 16th February, 1867

A very inclement morning. Notwithstanding, I went to the kitchen before light and sent Tom to Ju’s for Nannie’s “Album, ”telling him at the same time I would get breakfast. Mag had written a very pretty piece in it. Bill started with Nan in the buggy. “George and Fannie” to take the stage at nine o’clk. The day is very inclement, but moderate. Gave Nan fourteen dollars. – – Hardie started for Baltimore at ten to take the vessel at the W. Oak, Capt. Tolly.1 – – Pigeo and I made the best we could of the day and in spite of all, the blues would come occasionally. We busied ourselves all the time too in order to drive them away. Put the scattered things away both left and are trying to reconcile ourselves to our lot. The greatest pleasure we shall have now will be to hold sweet converse with all the absent ones and live in anticipation of meeting, if not again in this world, may we reunite in everlasting bliss and never be separated more. Cut out and hemmed three towels. Pigeo helped. I sewed little Mollie’s shoes she had ripped. – – Bill returned to dinner after placing Nan as comfortably as possible in a go cart. The stage could not travel on account of the roads. Trust the dear little heart will get safely to her destination. This is the third day three ploughs have been at work, with the exception of one less today. – – My fowls have commenced laying the last few days, 6 eggs yesterday and 7 today. – – Have had some two doz. fowls stolen from me, about the breaking up of the former residents here. Have only left me 50 hens and some ½ doz. roosters. Had ninety-seven in all first of the winter and have only parted with some 18 or 20. Pigeo and I swapped a white for a blk. pullet. Think she will amuse herself with that for a while. Have had my canaries in the porch 3 or 4 days. Hardie brought them up from the dining room.

  1. Probably this same Capt. Tolly appears in Caroline’s first volume on 12 March, 1855 delivering a load of lime. – – The 1860 US Census for KW show three adjacent households headed by men with maritime occupations at the Ayletts Post Office. All were born in Maryland. L. A. Bedwell, 32 is listed as a “Sea Captain.” R?. Shelly, 26, is a “Bay Captain” with $500 of personal property. Jno. Tolly, 36, is a “Sailor” and is the only one of the three listed as owning property, real estate worth $1,500 worth and $2,000 in personal property. He also has a four year-old daughter born in Virginia. Living with the Bedwells and Shellys are nine adult men with surnames different from their household heads. They are all described as “Sailors.” Besides obvious wives and children there is one more individual, Tho. Tolly, 45, just “Captain.” He is living with the Bedwells. Thomas and John seem to be sons of Thomas (1766-1825) and Mary Elizabeth [Bell] Tolley of Dorchester, Maryland. We seem to have identified our “Capt. Tolly.” In ten years the Census will show Thomas and John again living next to each other, this time in Lancaster County.  (back)