Tuesday, 9th April, 1867

A lovely day. Had my chamber cleaned and scalded, carpets taken up, bed sunned, &c. Fixed Mollie a little bed in one corner of my chamber, in order to know that she shall retire and rise early and try and break her of the indolent and idle habits she has contracted since the winter. Betty’s a very nice hand about the house. Mr. Cooke came this morning and spent the day, just from Baltimore, or rather from Dewberry, his Mother’s.1 No letters from Hardin as I expected. – – Bill went to Acquinton Church in the oxcart about wagons or cultivators, I don’t know which, after dinner. Sent Billy Pollard 4 lbs. butter, paid $.03 pound for it. – – Pigeo and I sent letters to be mailed to Nannie. I received report from the Lexington, and Pigeo a letter from Sadie Hopson. – – Commenced this evening to have supper 6 o’clk. in order to have milking done afterward. I always liked early suppers Spring and Summer in order to retire early and we cannot rise early, which I am in favor of. – – Mr. Cooke left between 5 and 6 and returned to go with Bill floating, but he declined going on acct. of the seine being tangled. Uncle Davy’s dragging for corn and the other three now ploughing.

  1. Mr. John McPhereson Cooke’s mother was Elizabeth Edmonia [Churchill] Cooke. Her husband, Rev. John McPhereson Cooke, died in 1861. The family home was Dewberry in western Hanover County, It is now on the National Register of Historic Places.  (back)