Monday, 29 August, 1864

I arose quite early this morning in order to make an early start to Ju’s, having been sent for in the night. Mag was sick, but it was so dark and rainy, and I was so tired I couldn’t possibly go. Sent Dellah with Philip. – – Bill delivered forty bushels oats to Mr. Sidner, “Tythes.”1 I took Rose and Nan up in the buggy. Mag has a fine son born last night.2 Mrs. Slaughter and Mrs. Edwards called on her this morning.3 While we were at dinner, Pigeo sent Frank up to tell the Col. was spending the day at Woodbury. I sent the keys by Frank and a note. I returned home at sunset, took Stuart with me. Bill informed me that the Col. wished to see me on some particular business. Left before I reached home and will come in a few days again. Bill and Pigeo entertained him. He played his flute a good deal for her. Wished very much for Nannie to play with him. Left just before I got home. – – Nan went to Mount Hope.

  1. These tithes, one-tenth of the produce of the land, were taxes instituted in the middle of war to support the Confederate war effort. They were generally unpopular. See Confederate Impressment During the Civil War.  (back)
  2. This would have been the sixth son born to Junius and Mag in eleven years. This is likely Robert Stuart Littlepage, age 7, who appears with his parents on the 1870 U.S. Census.  (back)
  3. Agnes Slaughter lived about two miles from Oak Dale past Zion Church. She is listed as 44 in the 1850 U.S. Census. Amazingly she ages only one year by the next census. Her sister(?) Sarah does almost as well, moving from 28 to 33. The 1863 Tax Rolls show Agnes as fee simple owner of 70 acres 2 miles east of the courthouse. The Mrs. Edwards could have been next door neighbor Ann Edwards, young wife of Kleber Edwards who was introduced 13 June. But there were many other Mrs. Slaughters and Edwardses in King William.  (back)

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